Tag Archives: adjustments

One Legged Living

I did it six years ago and I’m doing it again now.  Living life on one leg comes with its own set of challenges.   When living with such an inconvenience one must keep a positive eye on the future, for this will change and the future holds promise of greater mobility once again.

If you have been a reader for a while you know that six years ago I was riding my motorcycle when I was broadsided by a car.  As a result of that accident I had numerous injuries, including my left leg suffering three breaks and my ankle two breaks so severe they weren’t sure they could save my foot.   As time passed the ankle deteriorated to the point were it required an ankle fusion, which I had done on November 15, 2016.'As far as dancing goes, the doctor says you need to stay off my feet for 6-8 weeks.'

The procedure literally fuses my ankle at a 90-degree angle to the leg so I will never have flexibility in the ankle again.  The advantage, the ability to walk without pain. The disadvantage, it is a three-month non-weight bearing recovery.   I had to set up my house to live on the main floor for three months.  I have to depend on others to pick me up and drive me everywhere.

In my own domain I have mastered the basics of functioning on one leg within my own home.    Knee scooters are the next best thing since sliced bread.  My little scooter allows me to stand without risk of putting weight on the ankle while providing the ability to move fairly freely within the home, or any other building or surface where I am.  All I need is a transport person with the ability to lift my scooter in and out of their vehicle….and of course a vehicle that will hold the scooter!

I have mastered running my scooter with a hot cup of coffee in one hand, at least on most trips.  Carpet cleaning will be scheduled in the spring to remedy mishaps.  I can back up (frequently over my own toes, but we aren’t mentioning that), lift and drop the wheels to gain a better angle.  The scooter is handy when doing simple things like cooking and laundry.   I have also mastered locking the wheels, bending over with my knee on the scooter and placing my hands on the floor beside or in front of me to retrieve any item I may need.  This includes reaching to the back on the lowest level of cabinets.   I would give a safety specialist heart failure.

Now, all the wild maneuvers I have made which are outside the realm of safety have never caused me any issue.  Leave it to me to blow it when following all the rules.  Once evening I stood up to go somewhere within my own home I don’t know what happened but somehow I fell.  I thought I had my knee on the scooter when suddenly my body was tipping sideways.  I realized I was headed head-first into the exercise machine and grabbed onto the handle to avoid clobbering myself in the head while concentrating on keeping my leg bent and flat to the ground so as to lessen the impact and avoid putting weight on the ankle.  Once on the ground lifting myself back up using my right leg was a walk in the park.

That knee scooter is my lifeline to mobility and happiness no matter where I am.  It is wonderful for shopping, and allows me to easily navigate a restaurant when dining out.  I am held back only by my inability to manipulate it in and out of the vehicle and drive myself.

Now that winter has hit I am inhibited by my ability to operate the knee scooter  on ice and snow.  It tends to be uncooperative when offered those challenges.   For that reason I asked my daughter’s boyfriend to drop me at the front door a grocery store with my scooter, only to have him step out of the vehicle and immediately go down on the slippery surface.  Luckily he was not injured and quickly sprung back up off the parking lot while saying “I’m good.”    Needless to say precaution goes to the extreme when your support person wipes out in the parking lot and your foot hasn’t yet touched the ground.

Weather always offers its own set of challenges.  My daughter and I learned that when one of the platform steps she built for me to hop up and down the porch was covered in ice.   She was holding the edge of the walker to make sure it didn’t slide as I hopped down.  The problem arose when I leaned forward too much and our heads hit.   Knocking the assistant out with a head-butt is not recommended.  Luckily she maintained her footing and was none-the-worse for the knocked noggin.

"It's just a sprain. But let me put a cast on it so you won't look like an idiot for screaming like a freakin' schoolgirl."

Work is always interesting.  An empty trash can turned upside down makes a great footstool under your desk, but confuses clients who ask if that thing under there isn’t blocking the way of my leg.  An office chair on wheels is wonderful when navigating in a small space near your desk.  Boarding house reach also works beautifully for retrieving necessary materials no matter where I stand or sit.

Being immobile does have certain advantages.  My mail is picked up and delivered to the inside of my house.  I don’t have to stand outside and pump gas.  I don’t have to take out the trash.  I can make a “to do” list and have someone else do the running up and down the stairs to obtain whatever I need.   Unfortunately all the paperwork I thought I would be tackling full-force is not getting done as quickly as I had hoped.    Don’t ask…I haven’t thought up an excuse for that yet.

So the bottom line is, living life on one leg isn’t the easiest thing, but it isn’t the most horrid thing that could happen either.  Life is a Melting Pot of adventures, and this is just one of mine.

 

 

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Filed under Coping, handicapp, Life Changing, Life is a Melting Pot

A Year Of Changes

learn-free-to-be-meIf you have been a reader for a while you know that my husband, Ron,  passed away December 7, 2015 and since that time I have been adjusting to living on my own.  In reflecting on myself now, plans for the future and introspection of the past I have learned a few things.

I am capable of living alone, and doing it comfortably.  When I met Ron I was 19 and living at home with my parents.  I got married,  moved in with Ron and had never lived alone.  I originally found the idea of living solo terrifying but had no choice.    What I have learned is that living on my own has its benefits.  I can set the thermostat where I want and it stays there.  I can blast the radio at 2 am if I chose without having to worry about disturbing anyone else.  I can eat what I want when I want and not have to worry about anyone else.  I can re-arrange and hang photos and other artwork on the walls, removing things that were never my choice to begin with and adding new items that appeal to me.   I can move, add,  eliminate or change anything I chose without wondering if another person is going to like the change.

learn-to-be-happy-aloneAlthough I never paid attention to our finances and had no interest in knowing about them, I am perfectly capable of paying bills, applying for mortgage modifications, listing property for sale, and making decisions on financial assets.   I’m not blindly doing what Ron told me to do as he was dying.  I’m evaluating my own circumstances and making a decision that I feel comfortable with.   My goal for the future is to learn how the stock market and investments work, to understand how to diversify and what everything means  so I can make informed choices.  Hopefully  I will get a grasp on this within the next decade.  I’m really walking in uncharted territory here.

I can now run a riding lawn mower, a weed wacker, call a plumber, take vehicles in for routine maintenance, find and hire repair persons for things such as air conditioning. However I have no intention of learning to run the snowblower.  That thing is just too big.  I’ll kill myself shoveling first.  I even look at the Harbor Freight and Tractor Repair sales flyers now in case there is something I need.  Okay, I’ll admit my big purchase this year was two tarps, but we all have to start somewhere.  learn-dance-in-the-rain

One big surprise, I like to cook.  I know that sounds funny after 34 years of marriage, but I thought I didn’t like cooking.  I have been cooking for myself for a year now and I realize  that I like it.  For the majority of our marriage Ron did all the cooking.  Over the years I told people didn’t like doing day-to-day rush home from work an cook a meal, but I liked doing the larger family meals.  I recently said those words to someone but later in the evening it occurred to me that the statement isn’t true.  I don’t mind cooking for myself at all.  I love grilling entire meals in the summer months.  So why the change in my thoughts?

learn-something-newWhat I have discovered is that it wasn’t the cooking I disliked, it was that Ron always had a criticism of some sort and tended to hover, questioning why I did things the way I did, telling me I should do things differently than I did.  Nothing was ever quite good enough, there was always a “why didn’t you…”  Basically, he thought I should cook just  like him.  After a while I tired of the negativity and simply walked away and left it to him.  He cooked, I cleaned up, and it worked.

Since Ron’s passing I have discovered that I enjoy cooking.  I like throwing foods together to see what I like, mixing different combinations.  If they are all watching from above there are three cooks in heaven that are probably surprised at what they see.

I would say Ron is probably shocked at the things I fix; that I enjoy the cooking and especially like grilling.  My Mother-in-Law is probably happy to see me not measuring, just dumping in many instances.  I learned early in my marriage that if you called her for a recipe she didn’t measure, it was  “till it looks right.”  My father was a great cook.  When he saw me go into the basement and gather an assortment of ingredients, throw them into a pot and end up with a soup he was probably going “hell ya, that’s the way to cook.”  One of my greatest memories is when he cleaned out the refrigerator and made “chili” with the leftovers.  How many people have eaten chili with spaghettio’s floating in it?  I have!learn-who-you-are

When it comes to traveling alone I have mixed feelings.  It is nice because if I want to wander around and/or make frequent stops to take pictures I can do that without any complaints.  Ron and I were both photographers and did that all the time, but the average person does not take pleasure in such activities or delays.

On the other hand, traveling alone can be lonely.   If taking in a tourist attraction, such as wandering a museum or park, you are always alone.  No one to talk with, share discoveries with.   You are always eating alone, and so I always dine with a book.  There is no one sharing your hotel room, no one to sleep with. Maybe we shouldn’t go there.  Let’s just leave it at that.

So learning about me happened by learning to live alone.  What a difference a year has made.  The good, the bad, the indifferent.  What have I learned? I had a fantastic marriage.  I will have a fantastic future.  Different than I planned, but that’s okay.  I have made decisions that a year ago I would not have made.  I have made changes in my life that a year ago I would not have made.  Life was different then.  I was different then.  I am happy with my life, and that is all that matters.  Whatever happens, whatever life throws in my direction, I am ready.  Bring it on!

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Filed under anniversary, Coping, death, decisions, Discoveries, exploration, Family, food, habit, home, Life Changing, Life is a Melting Pot, marriage, Meals, memoir, mind, reality, time, vacation

When the Lights Go Out

Internet went downA week or so ago I was finally home for a Saturday, the first one in weeks, with a long to-do list.  At 10:30 am there was a glitch — we lost our power.  Washer and Dryer both stopped mid-cycle.  Dishwasher stopped mid- cycle.  I’m not used to this.  In the eleven years we have been in this house we have only lost power 3-4 times – why now?

It was rainy and gloomy outside, which means even with the blinds open it is dark.  I managed to get the small load of clothes out of the dryer and hung them to dry.  Then I stood in the house looking around.  What could I do that would allow me to be productive with only the light from the windows?

The CD’s on our shelves had all been taken down and needed to be reorganized, and there was a window nearby.  Not a very exciting project, but at least it was something.  Rather blah sorting music CD’s when you can’t even pop one in the player to listen to.  At least it was something to do.

Life without power is challenging.  Walk into the bathroom close the door and realize as you flip the switch that there is no light.  You are standing in a pitch black room because it has no window.  Exit the room and go look for a flashlight to use.  As you are looking for the flashlight you walk into a room and instinct comes into play…you hit the light switch out of habit, and again nothing happens.  Then you feel like an idiot….why would you be looking for a flashlight if the lights worked?

The coffee maker went off with the power, so now you want to warm up a cup of coffee, but the microwave won’t run.  The internet also went down with the electricity, so you try to surf using your phone, but due to lack of power the cell lines are tied up and nothing is loading.   Figure out lunch with items that do not require cooking.

It was around 4:30 that our electricity came back on.  Lights flashed on, lights that had been on when the power went down sprang to life.  However the internet was still out.  We have a package plan, internet, phone and TV, so nothing worked.  Predicted connection:  11:30 pm.   You feel like you’ve been stripped of contact with the world!  Now what will I do.  I have lights, but no TV, phone or internet.

Losing power, even for a short time, is a wake-up call to how dependent we are on technology.  Our ancestors lived without all these modern conveniences and did quite well without them.  Yet loose the for a portion of the day now and you find yourself lost, unable to function, because everything relies on electricity and/or internet connections.

Try going for a few hours without any lights, electricity, internet, TV or telephone.  Get back to the basics of life.  It will give you an appreciation for all you have, and for how your ancestors lived very happy, content lives without all our technology.

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Filed under Coping, Life is a Melting Pot